Directors

Finn E. Kydland

Director

Professor Finn E. Kydland is the Jeffery Henley Professor of Economics and 2004 Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences. Professor Kydland received his B.A. from the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Carnegie Mellon University. He joined the UCSB faculty in 2004, after previous appointments at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin, and the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration. He is a Research Associate for the Federal Reserve Banks of Dallas and St. Louis, and a Senior Research Fellow at the IC2 Institute at the University of Texas at Austin. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, and has held visiting scholar and professor positions at, among other places, the Hoover Institution and the Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He was elected a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 1992.

Professor Kydland was awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly with Professor Edward C. Prescott of Arizona State University. Professors Kydland and Prescott received the Nobel Prize for their research on business cycles and macroeconomic policy, specifically, the driving forces behind business cycles and the time consistency of economic policy. More recently, Professor Kydland has conducted research on the role of monetary policy for the business cycle. Moreover, he has studied Ireland and Argentina with the idea in mind that there is a lot for other nations' policy-makers to learn from the respective successes and failures of these two nations.


Peter Rupert

Associate Director

Peter Rupert is a Professor of Economics at UCSB, he joined the department in 2007 from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland where he was a Senior Research Advisor. His areas of interest include macroeconomics, monetary economics, labor, crime, housing and anything else that needs to be fixed. Peter helps identify important questions and facilitates bringing together researchers from around the world to attend LAEF conferences and shed light on the answers. His vita can be found here.



Leif Eiriksson

Founding Father

LAEF similates the Norwegian pronunciation of Leif, as in Leif Eiriksson, the great explorer and first European discoverer of North America. And exploration and discovery is what LAEF is all about! He established a Norse settlement at Vinland, tentatively identified with the Norse L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada. Leif's successful expedition in Vinland encouraged other Norsemen to also make the journey. Leif was described as a wise, considerate, and strong man of striking appearance.



Advisory Board

Gary Hansen

Gary Hansen is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Economics at UCLA, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His past appointments include a position at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and visiting positions at the University of Brasilia (Brazil) and the University of Pennsylvania. He has been at UCLA since 1987.

Professor Hansen received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. His fields of concentration include macroeconomic theory and policy, monetary economics, and aggregate labor economics. He has received numerous honors, awards, and grants during his professional career, including a William Fulbright Award, and several National Science Foundation Grants, among others. His professional service includes current and previous editorships of many academic journals.

Professor Hansen’s seminal work is Indivisible Labor and the Business Cycle, originally printed in the Journal of Monetary Economics in 1985, and reprinted several times since. His most recent publications include Capacity Constraints, Asymmetries, and the Business Cycle, with Edward G. Prescott, published in the Review of Economic Dynamics in 2005, and Why Have Business Cycle Fluctuations Become Less Volatile? with Andre Arias and Lee Ohanian, published in Economic Theory in 2007.


Per Krusell

Per Krusell is Professor of Economics at the Institute for International Economics Studies (IIES) at Stockholm University (with the Savings Banks Foundations and Swedbank Chair in Macroeconomics). He is also a Research Consultant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. His prior appointments include positions at Princeton University and at the Universities of Rochester and Pennsylvania. He is also currently a part-time Professor at the Institute for International Economics Studies in Sweden, and Research Consultant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. His prior appointments include positions at the Universities of Rochester and Pennsylvania. He is also Research Affiliate with the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Centro de Altísimos Estudios Ríos-Perez (CAERP).

Professor Krusell received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota. His research interests include macroeconomics, economic growth, political economy, and inequality.

Professor Krusell serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards for The Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, and for the Centro de Altísimos Estudios Ríos-Perez CAERP). He is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, an adjunct member of the Prize Committee for The Bank of Sweden Prize of Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, and a Fellow of the Econometric Society. He has received numerous National Science Foundation grants over his professional career, as well as grants and awards from various other prestigious institutions. He is currently editor of BE Journals in Macroeconomics and foreign editor of the Review of Economic Studies. Professor Krusell has supervised many graduate students in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Professor Krusell’s 1998 article in the Journal of Political Economy, Income and Wealth Heterogeneity in the Macroeconomy (joint with Anthony Smith), was pioneering in the use of heterogeneous-agent models. His other more recent notable work includes Consumption-Savings Decisions with Quasi-Geometric Discounting (Econometrica, 2003), joint with Anthony Smith, and the forthcoming The Dynamics of Government: A Positive Analysis (Journal of Monetary Economics, 2005) joint with John Hassler, Kjetil Storesletten, and Fabrizio Zilibotti.


José-Víctor Ríos-Rull

José-Víctor Ríos-Rull received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota where he is currently the Carlson Professor of Economics.. Professor Ríos-Rull also served as Senior Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and was Professor of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include macroeconomics with special concerns about heterogeneity and bankruptcy; demographics, specifically, family formation, aging, fertility, and their interplay with macroeconomics; and optimal policy without commitment.

Professor Ríos-Rull has advised graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, and Universitat Pompeu Fabra, in addition to students at the University of Pennsylvania. He has received numerous grants from the National Science Foundation, among other sources. He was elected a member of the Board of the Spanish Economic Association, and is Research Affiliate of the Center for European Policy Research, and Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research Program on Economic Fluctuations and Growth. He is also a Senior Researcher at the Centro de Análisis y Estudios Ríos Perez, CAERP. His editorial activities include the Review of Economic Studies and the International Economic Review, among others.

Professor Ríos-Rull has had numerous publications in many academic journals. He has been a pioneer in the use of calibrated overlapping generations models for addressing important questions. His most notable publications in this area include Working in the Market, Home Production and the Acquisition of Skills: A General Equilibrium Approach (American Economics Review, 1993), and Vested Interests in a Positive Theory of Stagnation and Growth, joint with Per Krusell (Review of Economic Studies, 1996). His additional important work includes On the Size of the U.S. Government, joint with Per Krusell (American Economics Review, 1999); Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality, joint with Per Krusell, Lee Ohanian, and Giovanni L. Violante (Econometrica, 2000); and Accounting for Earnings and Wealth Inequality, joint with Ana Castañeda and Javier Díaz-Giménez (Journal of Political Economy, 2003).


Richard Rogerson

Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University, Richard Rogerson received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining the Economics faculty at Princeton, Rogerson was Rondthaler Professor of Economics at Arizona State University. Other past academic appointments include positions at the Universities of Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Rochester, as well as Stanford and New York Universities.

Professor Rogerson has received many National Science Foundation grants, the most recent to study The European Employment Problem. His professional activities include organization of meetings and conferences in the United States, Canada and Europe, and current editorial positions at the American Economic Review and the Review of Economic Dynamics.

Professor Rogerson’s teaching and research interests are in the areas of labor economics and macroeconomics. His publications have appeared in many of the most important journals in the Economics profession, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Review of Economic Studies. His publications include papers on business cycle fluctuations, the effects of labor market regulations, financing of public education, and development; most notably, two pioneering works: Indivisible Labor, Lotteries and Equilibrium (Journal of Monetary Economics, 1988), and Homework in Macroeconomics: Household Production and Aggregate Fluctuations, joint with Jess Benhabib and Randall Wright (Journal of Political Economy, 1991). This latter work spawned a large body of literature on the interaction of household and market production.